February 13, 2009

A second look at childhood anger: Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak

For some reason I found myself thinking of one of my favourite childhood stories, Where The Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak and was lucky enough to find the words and some images from the book online. Sometimes it's interesting to take a second look at things, and this is very true when it comes to this book. I'm not going to detail my childhood tantrums here but it is interesting to get a fresh look at a classic story.




The night Max wore his wolf suit and made mischief of one kind

and another

his mother called him “WILD THING!”

and Max said “I’LL EAT YOU UP!”

so he was sent to bed without eating anything.

Moishe on the left and Bernard on the right.

That very night in Max’s room a forest grew

and grew-

and grew until his ceiling hung with vines

and the walls became the world all around

and an ocean tumbled by with a private boat for Max

and he sailed off through night and day

and in and out of weeks

and almost over a year

to where the wild things are.

Moishe bowing to Max, the king of all wild things.

And when he came to the place where the wild things are

they roared their terrible roars and gnashed their terrible teeth

and rolled their terrible eyes and showed their terrible claws

till Max said “BE STILL!”

and tamed them with the magic trick

of staring into all their yellow eyes without blinking once

and they were frightened and called him the most wild thing of all

and made him king of all wild things.

“And now,” cried Max, “let the wild rumpus start!”

“Now stop!” Max said and sent the wild things off to bed

without their supper.

And Max the king of all wild things was lonely

and wanted to be where someone loved him best of all.

Then all around from far away across the world

he smelled good things to eat

so he gave up being king of where the wild things are.

But the wild things cried, “Oh please don’t go-

we’ll eat you up- we love you so!”

And Max said, “No!”

The wild things roared their terrible roars and gnashed their terrible teeth

and rolled their terrible eyes and showed their terrible claws

but Max stepped into his private boat and waved good-bye

and sailed back over a year

and in and out of weeks

and through a day

and into the night of his very own room

where he found his supper waiting for him

and it was still hot.



Where the Wild Things Are- Maurice Sendak(1963)

February 12, 2009

Environmental Activism at Mount Allison: Lights Out Canada

One of the biggest attractions of Mount Allison for me is the student involvement on campus. At Mount Allison with a good idea and an application to the SAC you can become club on campus. A friend of mine, Keleigh Annau created the organization Lights Out Canada and is planning an event to bring attention to global climate change on campus on March 20th, 2009.

The group will ask that the school turn all the lights off on campus buildings and encourage student to go to the Lights Out website to commit to leading more sustainable lifestyles. On Earth Day (April 22, 2009), the group will encourage businesses and individuals to turn off their lights across the country.
Below I've included the project summary and steps for students, which is part of the Lesson Plan and Event Guide available at www.lightsoutcanada.org. For more information see their website or contact Keleigh Annau at lightsoutcanada@gmail.com

Project Summary:

"Turn off the lights & switch on education about global warming”

Lights Out Canada is a national event during which schools across the country turn off
their lights and spend the day learning about climate change and what youth can do to
lead more sustainable lifestyles.
Our goals are to:

- Educate students and teachers about the dangers of climate change.
- Provide participants with a host of ideas as to how to change everyday habits
and lead more sustainable lifestyles.
- Encourage schools to be aware of environmentally unfriendly practices, and
revise them.

We provide comprehensive lesson plans, step-by-step participation guides, and visual
aids in order to make Lights Out Canada a success in participating schools. By increasing
awareness and encouraging discussion, active participants will make a conscious effort
to curb their energy use, both at school, and at home.
Our lesson plans detail:

• What is global warming?
• Why is it occurring?
• Why is it a problem?
• How can I make a difference?

We want our peers to realize that global warming is not a far off concept, it is happening
now, and its effects are being felt today. Ice in the arctic is melting. Ocean levels are on
the rise, and changing climates have contributed to the extreme weather felt around
the world.

The repercussions of growing greenhouse gas emissions will be
one of the greatest (if not the most prominent) issues that our
generation will face. It is our responsibility to put an end to this
dangerous trend. It is no great inconvenience to turn off the
lights during the daylight hours, or when we leave a room, and it
is greatly beneficial to our health to walk or bike when that is a
feasible option. Lights Out Canada will not stop global warming.
It will, however, give students a quantity of tools they need to
preserve our country, and our planet, for future generations.

www.lightsoutcanada.org
lightsoutcanada@gmail.com





Steps for Students
Follow these steps to make Lights Out World a success at your school!
1. Read through the “Project Summary”. Visit: www.lightsoutcanada.org for more information and downloads. If
you have any further questions about the project, email the Lights Out Team at lightsoutcanada@gmail.com.
REMEMBER: Today is better than tomorrow! Start planning the event in your school ASAP! Making the
necessary arrangements earlier on will make the project much easier to carry‐out as the event draws nearer!
2. Give the “Steps for Teachers” and “Steps for Administrators” pages to your principal and a teacher who you
think would be interested in helping you with the project (perhaps your Leadership or Student Council
facilitator).
3. Once you have discussed the project with your principal (BE ENTHUSIASTIC!) and received permission to hold
Lights Out Canada in your school, register your school on www.lightsoutcanada.org.
4. Take the project idea to your school’s leadership class and student council. Although there is not much extra
work involved, there will probably be other students willing to help you put up posters, etc.
5. Either present Lights Out Canada at a staff meeting, or ask your teacher liaison or principal to let all of the
teachers know about the project. Don’t be nervous about presenting; you could simply read from the “Project
Summary”.
6. Check in with your teacher and principal each week leading up to the national Lights Out Canada day to make
sure that any concerns they have are addressed. (Remember: email the Lights Out Team with any questions,
any time!)
7. Two weeks prior to the Lights Out Day (April 22, 2009), put up the Lights Out posters. If you need more posters
to plaster your school with, either ask permission from your teacher to use the school’s photocopier or print
them off from www.lightsoutcanada.org (under “Stuff For You”). If possible, please use recycled paper and
either save the poster for future Lights Out events or recycle them after the event.
If your school has morning announcements or a school newsletter, let the rest of the school know about Lights
Out Canada with a blurb such as:
“Lights Out Canada‐ On (April 22, 2009), our school will be participating in the international event
“Lights Out Canada”. Get ready to turn off the lights and switch on education about climate change!”
Remember: The best advertising method is word of mouth. Tell all of your friends about the project. Ask your
teachers if you can have 3 minutes at the beginning of each class to remind people of the event and why your
school is participating. We’ve learned through experience that if you are passionate about the project, your
enthusiasm will be contagious.
8. Ask permission from your liaison teacher to photocopy the lesson plans for your school at least three weeks
before the Lights Out Day. Distribute the lesson plans at least two weeks in advance either directly to the
teachers or in their boxes (if you do this you must also make announcements reminding the teachers that that
is where they are located). NOTE: The lesson plans are to be run through at the beginning of the Lights Out
Day, so save paper and only distribute them to teachers that will have classes that morning. Don’t forget to
photocopy on both sides and use recycled paper if possible.
9. Make sure teachers know that in dark areas of the school, only turning off half the lights is fine.
10. Inspire other youth and do presentations in local schools. We will provide you with copies of the presentations
we use. Email us and spread the word amongst youth in your area!
11. On April 22, 2009, turn off the lights! The Lights Out Team would really appreciate feedback after the event
and any pictures or anecdotes about how you celebrated the Lights Out Day in your school!



February 11, 2009

The Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative: Upcoming Passport Requirements when entering the United States

I have been in the process of applying for my passports and at the same time keeping myself informed of the upcoming requirements when crossing the border. To avoid the long waits and headaches that occurred when when the last requirements went into effect I applied early. As these new regulations effect Canadians and Americans I feel that it's fitting to provide some information. The information below is from http://getyouhome.gov. More specifics on the program are available from the State Department.

The Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative, or WHTI,requires U.S. and Canadian travelers to present a passport or other document that denotes identity and citizenship when entering the U.S. It is a result of the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 (IRTPA).

The goal of the WHTI is to facilitate entry for U.S. citizens and legitimate foreign visitors, while strengthening U.S. border security. Standard documentation will enable the Department of Homeland Security to quickly and reliably identify a traveler. WHTI will go into effect June 1, 2009 for land and sea travel into the U.S.

WHTI went into effect for air travelers on January 23, 2007.


Canadian Citizens

Simplify your travel checklist!

On June 1, 2009, Canadian citizens traveling to the U.S. by land or sea will be will be required to present one of the travel documents listed below.

Many of these documents are already available, and obtaining one now will ensure that you are ready on June 1, 2009, when they will be required.

Canadian Passport – This is an internationally recognized travel document that verifies a person’s identity and citizenship. It is accepted for travel by air, land and sea.

Enhanced Driver’s Licence – British Columbia has launched a pilot program to issue this driver’s licence that denotes identity and citizenship. It is specifically designed for cross-border travel into the U.S. by land or sea. Several other provinces will be issuing an enhanced driver’s licence or identification document.

Trusted Traveler Programs – NEXUS or FAST/Expres enrollment cards can speed your entry into the U.S. and
are issued only to pre-approved travelers. FAST/Expres cards are valid for use at land or sea; the NEXUS card can be used at land or sea ports of entry and at kiosks at participating airports.

Special Audiences – Information for Parents and Children, Native Americans, and Boaters.

Canadian Passport – This is an internationally recognized travel document that verifies a person’s identity and citizenship. It is accepted for travel by air, land and sea.

Canadian Passport

24 pages
CAN $87 (Age 16 & Older)
CAN $37 (Age 3 to 15)
CAN $22 (Under Age 3)

Validity: 5 years for anyone age 3 and over
3 years for children under age 3

Issued by: Passport Canada

Info: www.passportcanada.gc.ca


Enhanced Driver's License – An enhanced driver’s licence is a secure driver’s licence that denotes both identity and Canadian citizenship, and will be issued by certain provinces and territories. It is an acceptable document for entry into the U.S. by land and sea.

British Columbia has launched the first phase of a program to issue an EDL. Several other provinces and territories are planning to implement EDL programs.

Enhanced Driver's License

Currently Issued by: British Columbia for a limited pilot program. No new applications are being accepted at this time.

Limitations: Not valid for international air travel.

Info: Check your province's website or www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca for updates.

Children: U.S. and Canadian children under the age of 16 will be able to present the original or copy of their birth certificates, or other proof of citizenship such as a naturalization certificate or citizenship card to enter the U.S. by land or sea.

Groups of U.S. and Canadian children ages 16 through 18, when traveling with a school or religious group, social organization, or sports team, will be able to enter under adult supervision with originals or copies of their birth certificates or other proof of citizenship.

Native Americans: Native Americans will be able to continue presenting tribal documents, including the current Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) card, until June 1, 2009, provided they are affixed with a photo. Indian and Northern Affairs Canada plans to issue a new identification card for Canadian Indians, which, if designated by the US government, will be acceptable for entry to the United States following implementation of WHTI on June 1, 2009.

For additional information on the Secure Certificate of Indian Status, visit the website for Indian and Northern Affairs Canada.

Ferries and Small Boats: Passengers on ferries and small boat operators are processed much like travelers entering the U.S. through a land border. They are required to present one of the travel document that complies with WHTI.

Boaters: I-68 Registration Holders: Boaters who have an I-68 form will need to follow the new travel document requirements. A NEXUS card is an alternative to a passport for entry into the U.S., and ensuring that you have either a NEXUS card or a passport will enable you to continue to utilize telephonic clearance procedures currently in place for I-68 holders.

An I-68 form is similar to a vehicle registration, and is not an identity document or a travel document.

Canadian citizens traveling by air to, through or from the United States must present a valid passport or a valid NEXUS card when used at kiosks at participating airports. This requirement applies to all travelers, regardless of age, including children.

http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca


US Citizens

Simplify your travel checklist!

On June 1, 2009, U.S. citizens returning home from Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean or Bermuda, by land or sea, know that they will soon be required to present one of the travel documents listed below.

Many of these documents are already available, and obtaining one now will ensure that you are ready on June 1, 2009, when they will be required.

U.S. PassportThis is an internationally recognized travel document that verifies a person’s identity and nationality. It is accepted for travel by air, land and sea.

U.S. Passport CardThis is a new, limited-use travel document that fits in your wallet and costs less than a U.S. Passport. It is only valid for travel by land, and sea.

Enhanced Driver’s License (EDL)Several states and Canadian provinces are issuing this driver’s license or identification document that denotes identity and citizenship. It is specifically designed for cross-border travel into the U.S. by land or sea.

Trusted Traveler Program CardsNEXUS, SENTRI, or FAST enrollment cards can speed your entry into the U.S. and are issued only to pre-approved, low-risk travelers. The cards are valid for use at land or sea; the NEXUS card can be used in airports with a NEXUS kiosk.

Special AudiencesInformation for Parents and Children, Native Americans, and Boaters.

Knowing what documents are required and having them ready when you return home will help streamline the entry process and ensure your return to the U.S. is as smooth as possible.

U.S. Passport - This is an internationally recognized travel document that verifies a person’s identity and nationality. It is accepted for travel by air, land and sea.

U.S. Passport [Image]

Cost: $100 (Age 16 & Older)
$85 (Under Age 16)

Validity: 10 years for adults
5 years for children under age 16

Issued by: U.S. Department of State

Info: www.travel.state.gov

U.S. Passport Card – This is a limited-use international travel document valid for entry into the U.S. by land or sea from Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean or Bermuda. It is not valid for international air travel.

U.S. Passport Card [Image]

Cost: $45 (Age 16 & Older))
$35 (Under Age 16)
$20 (If requested with a new or renewed passport)

Validity: 10 years for adults
5 years for children under age 16

Issued by: U.S. Department of State

Limitations: Not valid for international air travel

Info: www.travel.state.gov

Enhanced Driver's License – This is a driver’s license that can also be used as a cross-border travel document to enter the U.S. by land and sea. It denotes both identity and citizenship.

Enhanced Driver's License [Image]

Cost: $15 - $30 more than a regular license

Validity: Validation will vary by state

Currently Issued by: Washington State

Limitations: Not valid for international air travel

Info: Washington State DMV, New York DMV

Coming Soon: ...Vermont, Arizona, and Michigan

Children: U.S. and Canadian children under the age of 16 will be able to present the original or copy of their birth certificates, or other proof of citizenship such as a naturalization certificate or citizenship card.

Groups of U.S. and Canadian children ages 16 through 18, when traveling with a school or religious group, social organization, or sports team, will be able to enter under adult supervision with originals or copies of their birth certificates or other proof of citizenship.

Native Americans: Native Americans will be able to continue presenting tribal documents until June 1, 2009, provided they are affixed with a photo. Customs and Border Protection is working closely with interested Native American tribes toward the development of an enhanced tribal card that complies with WHTI.

Cruise Ship Passengers: U.S. citizens on closed-loop cruises (cruises that begin and end at the same U.S. port) will be able to enter or depart the country with a birth certificate and government-issued photo ID. Please be aware that you may still be required to present a passport to enter the countries your cruise ship is visiting. Check with your cruise line to ensure you have the appropriate documents.

U.S. Lawful Permanent Residents: Document requirements for Lawful Permanent Residents will not change under WHTI. U.S. Lawful Permanent Residents can continue to use their permanent resident card (Form I-551) or other valid evidence of permanent residence status.

Ferries and Small Boats: Passengers on ferries and small boat operators are processed much like travelers entering the U.S. through a land border. They are required to present one of the travel document that complies with WHTI.

Boaters: I-68 Registration Holders: Boaters who have an I-68 form will need to follow the new travel document requirements. A NEXUS card is an alternative to a passport for entry into the U.S., and ensuring that you have either a NEXUS card or a passport will enable you to continue to utilize telephonic clearance procedures currently in place for I-68 holders.

An I-68 form is similar to a vehicle registration, and is not an identity document or a travel document.

When traveling by air between the U.S. and Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean or Bermuda, you are required to present a U.S. Passport, except as noted below. This applies to everyone including newborns, infants and children.

The only exceptions to this requirement are for:

  • U.S. citizen on active duty with the U.S. Armed Forces, traveling with military ID and travel orders
  • U.S. citizen merchant mariners traveling in conjunction with maritime business, with U.S. issued Merchant Mariner Document
  • Travelers with a NEXUS card for use at a NEXUS kiosk at Canadian Preclearance airports
  • U.S. Lawful Permanent Residents with a Permanent Resident Card or other evidence of permanent residence status and required documentation; refugees and asylees with a Refugee Travel Document

For more information on the travel documents required for U.S. citizens to enter or re-enter the United States, please click here.

February 8, 2009

Day in the Life Part Six: Jennings Meal Hall

Most first year students get the Unlimited Food plan...which allows/forces you to eat at meal hall three times a day...well...two times a day Saturday and Sunday. Jennings Meal Hall is pretty good...and offers some pretty good selection (hot meal, salad bar, sandwich bar, vegetarian, etc...) for a small school. Obviously meals get recycled after a while...but it's generally pretty good. Some unnecessarily corny pictures: